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as a navy. as you see here, chile is located in the southwest coast of south america and we had an earthquake on february 27, 2010, with an intensity of 8.8 richter scale located approximately in the center of the country. the subduction zone, the area where the plate and the south american plate made contact was 250 kilometers. that means that the intensity was felt above 8 in about one-third of the country. as you can see, in the highlight color you can see the people who was affected with that earthquake at about 6 million people. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that thing
, and orchestra of young musicians from islam have been touring south america using instruments constructed entirely from recycled materials. they pulled them from the rubbish dumps around their homes. you can get more on our web sites bbc.com on those stories and many more. the spanish tenor coming go has performed in front of 20,000 people to raise money and awareness for youth orchestra in the violence-plagued city of acapulco. ♪ he was joined by 320 young performers were in july the orchestra was for a risk children between 8-18 years of age. most of the youngsters have little or no music express before joining. a quick update from the central african republic or rebels seized much of the country have renewed their threat to enter the capital. the president says he's ready to form a national anti-government after the coalition launched a rebellion earlier this month. >> the headlines here on bbc world news. politicians in washington are facing another day of intense negotiations. they have got to reach a deal to prevent damaging tax rises and spending cuts. hillary clinton is in the h
and things in china. so the growth in the america, south america and emerging markets. when you look at food service, even on some slower, you know, flattish type growth over the second and third quarters, the margin increases that we've had i think people are starting to see why the combination of these two as you showed earlier, cranes, plus food service equals profit. liz: okay. i mean i definitely see that but you just mentioned europe. where is the growth in your crane business? who is, buying your cranes? sorry, is it asia, or you just mentioned south america s that sort of a brazil pre-olympics play? >> i think actually it is sort of obviously brazil but there is chile, peru, colombia, all have been good markets and so, you know, the americas has been good. if you look at what is going on in the energy and the, the energy and the petro chem type business, the fracking is good type business and boom trucks that has driven the growth. you have australia's been good. russia is coming back. after can has been a good story this year. i think you put all that together on the crane side it o
of state has to work with our allies in latin america, and south america, to come up with a strategy. we can't go it alone. we have to work with those countries. they have to recognize the threat. they have to tell us about who's there, what they're there for. then we've got to focus on our border. these are energy issues with pipelines. these are folks that are coming across our southern border possibly, strengthening that. working with all the agencies. the department of state needs to lead on this. this is their area. melissa: congressman, thanks so much for coming on. interesting stuff. >> melissa, thank you very much. melissa: so next on "money", all you want to do is take a huge bite of that hot, juicy hamburger. but there is always that disgusting wrapper getting in the way, right? well, if you're one of those people just too lazy, too lazy to take the thing off, your troubles are finally over. the edible wrapper has finally arrived. i'm not sure that is it. he may be eating a regular wrapper. at the end of the day it is all about money. [laughter] ...so as you can see, geico's cu
, which countries do you envision south america, africa, you wrote about india obviously. in to be applied in and share our objectives? >> interesting brazil has carved out the identity. they always have trouble making arrangements to do missions of brazil. they are more standoffish. because of geography in west africa over the force of a decade so brazil would not be cost file to the united states but it would be independent with its own point* of view. says that may lead to argentina and develop their balance against brazil. it is strategic about the united states has gotten since the cold wear to asia -- from the rise of the cold war. it has been over hyped but within ds 2012 it is the enormous development. of the indian policy establishment would reject it like a diseased germ. with india aware it is on the map with the economic and military rise is against china. we should not get concessions but anchorage development in a way that we can. >> with your presentation of your book with the u.s. and everything here is absolutely clear. speenine. [laughter] could you talk about israel? a c
, five years. we have central and south america and all of asia including china. there's so many opportunities to grow hello kitty as well, too. if we want to double our company's size, we need more. >> that's your goal. what's the time frame for accomplishing that? >> we're looking for something like five years. in these five years we have increased our market cap for five times larger. and what we want to do is to continue that. 20% to 30% growth. >> and acquisitions as you say will be a key part here. what targets are you looking at and what's funding like for purchases you want to make? >> we have a cash position of close to 400 million u.s. dollars. and we have a deficit stimulus side. basically we don't have debt. we can finance, as well. but we have cash flows. so there's no worry about the cash. >> okay. >> yeah. i was going to -- in terms of extending the brands, how do you embrace the digital arena here in things like ebooks and -- >> yes. we just started amazon.com program with mr. man and little miss. it's really since jettic. especially the small kids love digital ip
and is a beautiful facility but more importantly there have been new routes added from europe and south america, direct service into las vegas and that opened up 50 markets in latin america for us and las vegas particularly the cosmopolitan really resonates. dennis: surprising given the fears of global recession that you're getting international guests. when i read about the hotel-casino is almost beside the point. it gets one line in a 13 line paragraph, you have a new ice skating rink. what is going on? >> the casino is a central part of las vegas and that is why people came here and continue to come here. 80% of people to las vegas game. that is an important segment of our business. that being said, what sets casinos and hotels apart are the other amenities. for us it is the guest rooms, residential style guest room with terraces where you can step out on your terrace and engage in las vegas and on the strip in a way that can't be done in other places. in the pool district where the ice rink opened a few weeks ago sits about 100 feet above the strips to you tonight skate and looked down at t
traveling to places like australia and central and south america to open up the franchises and you were only 20 years old. >> i was 19 and 20 years old when i was travel all over the world and trying to pursue my dream of being an engineer and an attorney at the same time traveling globally. those two things simultaneously don't really support each other so i ended up dropping out of college. jenna: a lot of folks are face thag decision righfacing that decision right now, whether or not to get a job and start working or get student loans and put themselves through school. what would your advice be. >> education is a path to personal success. there are many avenues to get there, certificate programs, classes that colleges offer. classes that companies offer to allow people to pursue their education in the short term. as they become more stable in their jobs they might be able to afford investing in higher education. jenna: you tkpw-pbt ge didn't get your college degree, you were able to get your master's degree in business. you said that's been helpful in the position you're in right now. >>
of the ski resort lifestyle and they'll travel to find it. whether that's south america in the summer or it's the russians because their local snow is not that good or really americans and europeans who are back and forth between the alps, canadian rocky, rockies. even right now when aspen and vail aren't having the best early season, we're having tremendous snow through the canadian rockies, british columbia and alberta. those resorts are opening early. hotels are full. right now of course you're having this string wind river i believe they're calling it which is dumping tons of snow on the high sierras. they'll be digging out the snow lifts. >> if you've had poor snow the previous season, how does that then -- must reflect into people buying equipment and clothes. snowfall presumably spills out not just into the people who go to the resort, but all the equipment manufacturers get impacted, do they? >> absolutely. we had a really interesting situation that happened over the last couple years. we had a lean year last year which was following a very what we'd call an epic year where it just
of miles away from where the end consumer is. how do you actually know what consumers let's say in south america, africa actually like in terms of fragrances? >> it's imminently linked to the culture of a local country. especially on the state side, especially on the flavor side. so we don't create fragrances and flavors for the indians and the chinese. we have 9,000 people around the world. half of them create the next fragrances and flavors. and out of those 4,500 people, you have roughly 2,000 people who are actually in those countries. they are local people so we are chinese employees, chinese favors, will create those fragrances and flavors for the whole market. because, again, you can't know about the local culture out of switzerland. so you have to by there. and we have there in all of those countries so we do expensive consumer tests. we do expensive consumer insight. we drive the trend and that's helpful to grow in those markets. >> another factor that's created a lot of headache is the strength. how difficult is it to be a globally operating company that's based here in switzer
ruled island off south america invaded by argentina in 1982. the british sent troops and warships to retake it. but behind the scenes there was conflict with mr. reagan urging her to negligent a truce which she angrily rejected and her asking for his support. you are the only person who will understand. she was not always happy with his responses, describing one of his late night messages regarding the faulk lands invasion, so vague i didn't think it was worth reading. one letter shows the woman the british nicknamed the iron lady could have a velvet side adding a p.s. to the president who was a bit under the weather. warm personal regards and a rapid recovery to full health and strength. the world needs you. yours sincerely, margaret thatcher. >> the documents released by britain's national archives also shows her asking british counterparts for fashion advice about what mr. reagan should wear for a horseback ride with the queen during a june 1982 visit. the answer smart but casual not formal riding attire, advice the president took. the british were concern
not thrilled at the prospect of a reunified korea having south korea and america right across the river. this is an area where the chinese could tune themselves up a little. but clearly they are not in love with north korea. >> i can only say china is trying to encourage the transformation of korea and encouraging north korea to follow the same path china has engaged in in the last several, opening up their economy in china has been actively trying to establish free trade zones, encouraging other countries to establish operations in certain areas as a way to try to beef up the north korean economy and hope that that may lessen the isolation of north korea and therefore are influenced their foreign policy and some of their military policies. >> on the outside there. >> what about china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china
was performing another person's song. at that time, in 2002, in 2003, you'll remember the south korean people were angry about america about a situation that happened in america that was tragic that involved a south korean. do you think, though, that when he apologizes, is that enough? >> no. >> to be able to be granted a chance to perform at the annual christmas show in washington. >> he didn't just do it's once. he did it twice. it was a protest rally against americans. supposedly he's popular on youtube, everybody's seen him dancing around, doing all that, doesn't mean you get an audience with the president of the united states in one of our most celebrated holidays. he should be on the no-fly list for what he did, for goodness sakes, let alone meeting with the president of the united states. it doesn't make sense. it's offensive to the servicemen and women, their families, their loved ones, who are out there in harm's way, to put this punk out there with the president of the united states in one of our most celebrated holidays. it's just wrong. >> i wonder if he's had any -- like a true c
, nearly a third of the market will be north and south america. a third will be europe and russia and africa. and about a third of the market will be asia pacific. and in china's case, to your point, china now has replaced the united states as the largest auto market. the chinese veitremendous respe for history. they know about henry ford and lincoln. so we'll be bringing the first lincoln vehicles to china in 2014. >> alan mulally, ford president and ceo. thank you for coming on. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> now this. an infant left without her parents after an nfl player just snaps. and now as a city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> if syria's chemical weapons are on the move, who's watching them? and where do they end up? >>> plus, as eight more people die in chicago -- >> we walk through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't figure out what they had done with the money. >> -- cnn investigates the program getting cash to st
to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggressive rivals in canada and south america. that is pitting them against unions, which are struggling to reserve high-paying jobs for the middle-class members. it was resolved late tuesday, according to this article. here is the front page of the press." feet frefree state says detroit out of time to fix its fiscal mess. falling revenues and rising expenses. the state of michigan delivered an abrupt ultimatum to the city wednesday. move quickly toward reform, or an emergency financial manager will be reported. -- a ppointed. -- appointed. dana in california, republican. caller: i'm 56 years old. i live in california. i can give the perspective of what has happened in my state and the economy and all that stuff. back in 1982, i was making $8.50 an hour. but i have seen happen in my state and happening in more, not just illegal immigrants, but our children. i have watched my state do a nose dive. people cannot afford more things. i'm watching them destroy our social system, our schools. it is absolute insanity, but i see happeni
should be worn in for a new six-year term in january. >> romo says this will move markets all over south america too. >> when you heard the announcement, a lot of people said it sounded like his good-bye. >> certainly did. >> 16 minutes past the hour. >>> extended look for our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart and twitter and facebook. search for early start cnn. >>> coming up this sunday on the next list, a successful arts studio, but he made his mark on the corporate world as cofounder of square. >> it allows small businesses to accept credit cards. his company worth billions. but he's still an artist at heart. >> art is what can't be proven mathematically, right? where science ends, the part that makes you feel good, but you don't know why. the way the object feels in your hand and looks, and if it's perfectly created, you can almost explain it to somebody else afterward. but in the creation part, you can't. you can see how glass is hon stantly moving. my job is to shape it. balance it at the same time. you can do that, you get these wonderful shapes. glass really rewards risk.
today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and others. >> what are they doing with that power? that's the interesting thing. >> so they have the power, and they are using it. you have states like kansas and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you have a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican and are aggressively promoting pro energyer drilling policies to get at the pir natural resources. and the big story you mentioned was what is happening with right to work. and it wasn't just michigan. sometimes we forget that earlier indiana was a right to work state too. so two midwestern states that are traditionally m heavy unionized moved to the right to work. i wouldn't be surprised if we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting i contrast in maryland and virginia. in virginian you have republican governor cutting taxes and cutting s
in european europe and hard in south africa and latin america but i think there is some hope that the dynamics can carry them through. >> the united states has to play an active leadership role rather than a passive leadership role. if the united states is passive and barack obama represents democratic ideas that it should be more passive this is the kind of world that results. i think places like egypt and even syria were looking to the united states to have a presence in this transition, but we have not seen the have and we're seen the results. >> paul: where is the potential of flash points? >> we don't talk about europe enough. the crisis in europe has not turned the corner. it's going to get dra mat kli worse. in portugal, spain, italy, there isening political dysfunction. that is going to encourage russia to make moves of its own. you mention south africa, south africa is not going in 'n a good direction. it was supposed to be the most optimistic spot. maybe new zealand but somebody told me they are heading south. >> paul: coming down to obamacare. big changes may be coming for 2013 for
. chief justice john roberts. great can conservative goes south on obamacare breaking the hearts of conservatives all over america. >> what did he do. >> ? he voted for obamacare, to uphold it as constitutional and he said it was a tax. not a fee. >> well, it needs more clarification. >> south carolina senator jim demint, who is resigning his senate seat and becoming the president of the heritage foundation, which in effect is an admission that the tea party forces where he was their mentor and benefactor, that they are a spent force in the senate at least. >> what kind of a salary does that job have? >> a million plus with a little financial incentive. >> a million bucks a year. >> that has nothing to do withth him going over there, though? >> i think it has something to do with it. >> i would say the abandonment by this administration of a 30-year ally. namely, mubarak in egypt in such a way that it lost and undermine the confidence of the entire arab world in the loyalty and credibility of america as an ally. >> i put morsy in there. >> i did. >> it goes to president obama fro
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
, and south america, which we really don't have now. really makes us a global powerhouse. >> you know, is the underwear business and the jeans business a bigger business than the suit business for example? >> yes. the underwear business worldwide is over a billion dollars in sales and jeans business is close to $2 billion. so those are the two largest categories followed by fragrance which is about a billion and a half dollars. >> when you did the tommy deal you knocked the cover off the ball. you put some numbers out. you delevered the company quickly. now you're back doing the warnerco deal. is this going to be as transformational? >> i think in some ways it's going to be more transformational. it really opens up two key markets for us to operate directly. today we are operating on joint ventures and licensing arrangements. so in asia, china specifically, ind india, and in latin america with brazil, you know, really opening up the developing economies, where warnaco, in those two areas approaching 20%. >> phillips-van heusen, to be able to transform it from what we think of when we
on earth. best way to play it, kansas city southern. the new railroad running north/south across north america, or as they sometimes call themselves, the nafta railroad. at last, maybe we can get some revenge for all of the jobs nafta has caused us. all of the losses. anyway, ksu is my new favorite rail. and i think you can buy it at the weakest because it's got the tracks where people want them and little competition to boot. let's go to greg in mississippi, greg? >> yes, mr. cramer, thank you so much for taking my call. >> my pleasure. >> caller: i had the pleasure of speaking to you on the "lightning round" a couple of months ago about nordic tanker. >> yeah, go ahead, i'm sorry. >> caller: no, no, i'm sorry, at that time you recommended me not go into that particular stock. i was just wondering, you highly recommended it in your book getting back to even which i thoroughly enjoyed, and i was curious if anything changed in particular with the company or that sector in general. >> i had to back away from it. and i think those who know the show and watch it know that i've backed away
, west, and the south. >> of the u.s. state department is criticizing russia oppose the upper house banning americas from adopting russian children. the bill will go to the president for his approval. several protesters were arrested outside of the building. >> outside parliament, the knowledge of the quickly with demonstrators protesting as the bill which bars americans from adopting russian orphans. >> is not useful for our children or our national security or priorities. this lot is draconian and should not be adopted by the council. >> they unanimously backed the proposals which only leaves the signature of the president to become law. it is one of the toughest pieces of anti-u.s. legislation in years past in retaliation for an american law that would impose sanctions on russian officials implicated in human rights offenses. 16,000 russian orphans have been adopted by russian families. opponents say the real victims will be the children. kids will stays, orphans. they have visas and they will not be treated properly. it is likely a death sentence for them. >> adoptions by americ
? i will talk about the bricks in a minute. i am talking about south america, eastern europe, parts of asia. why do i love this story? it is basic macroeconomics. the key ingredients that drive growth. we know the story of debt, deficit, fiscal cliff. we know that the story of the aging population and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50
to the south and the tropics, into the 30s there. let's head on into the americas. central portions are looking calm and clear. a storm from the pacific, dropping down from b.c. to central california. chilly showers to post coastal areas. and we'll be seeing some snow, a few inches on the sierra nevadas and moving inland as well. strongest gusts bringing temperatures down in portions of southern california in the next couple of days. out toward the east, we've been watching a stubborn system move away out over the atlantic, but what will be left over is heavy showers in the eastern gulf states as well as in the florida peninsula and you can see some severe thunderstorms erupting there too. here are temperatures. a big drop out in the northeast. new york city, 9 degrees today. 9 in d.c. a drop of 10 degrees between monday and tuesday. further up toward the north. that's your high temperature. winnipeg, minus 20. high temperature, even down to houston, 13 for the high. but overnight lows will be around the freezing point. as for europe, not too much to worry about for western and central location
will get even cooler as we head into your friday here. in the south, warmer than average in hong kong with a high of 24. moving into america, wet and windy conditions common for the west, a series of lows moving into the western pacific and heavy mountain snow. blizzard warnings are posted for parts of washington and oregon. snow about 50 centimetres and gusts of 80 kilometres power on the cars. things are getting very active. here things remaining wet and windy on your monday. out east thundershowers for the southern parts of the plains up into the east and northeast. icy participation for southern quebec and parts of the new england states, and there will be a risk of severe weather happening in southeastern texas and central parts of the gulf state. there will be a risk of thunderstorms, gusty winds and even tornadoes into tonight. severe weather will be shifting toward the east as we're heading toward your monday. despite rainy weather, temperatures way above average. 14 degrees in washington, d.c. that's about 60 degrees higher than seasonal. finally let's go over to the european
that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources and of course, the big story that you mentioned, paul, is what's happening with right to work, it wasn't just michigan, sometimes we forget earlier indiana became a right to work state, too, so, two midwestern states that have traditionally been pretty heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and vi
complaints about south korea and america's naval exercises, or the sailor that was detained by japan and taken into custody for a while. do you think that this is essentially china's wise to test the solvency and strength and direction of u.s. japan relations? if you do think it is that, the more provocative question again coming to your own nation strategy because japan is origination but it's an aging nation, it's a shrinking nation. when you look at and one wonders wonders what is japan's strategy in the region with allies and how to keep are so vital and robust when china may be saying when you look at long lines, japan will become less significant over time. we will become more significant over time. if i can add one last element. when president obama's national strategy to -- strategic policy was released, there's one thing we read who said america is undergoing a period of strategic contraction. he may be wrong. i loved her the counter position to that, but they're all of these assessments that this is the time for china to push these boundaries out. and so, what do you take i
casualties -- well, i should say 500 thais died in south vietnam while fighting what we call the veitkong, and it's important to focus on it because they tend to dismiss them as america's mercenaries because we paid for the -- a lot of the military hardware and transportation and lo gist ticks and extry pay that the thai troops received, and we focus on thais engaged in black market schemes, but truth behind it all is that thai soldiers were figging. thai soldiers were dying for four years. thailand was carrying out their war, what they saw as their war in south vietnam so the casualties are something to keep in mind. >> host: professor ruth, thai-u.s. relations, when did they start to really jell? they were an ally for a long time participating in the iraq war and world war ii. >> guest: absolutely. it can date back to king monk and famous example of offering lincoln war elephants for his troubles for the american civil war, but definitely in the 20th century, the thais were always close u.s. ally. i mean, and this is intensified really disrurpted partly during the second war ii, but as
? a presidential historian weighs in. so long, hollywood. america's got a new hot spot for movies in the deep south. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your fu
in a big way. the ambitious plan that would transform this land into something that looks more like south of market. >> and one of the hottest debates in america broke ground in california today. our region is about to be fracked. >> it's also about to dry out. we had a weak little storm move through the bay area that's mostly gone. tomorrow looks good. and then changes are on the way. we have all the details coming up with our forecast after a break. ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, project in san francisco has taken a big step forward. nw three different bay area locations could st >>> an ambitious development project in san francisco has taken a big step forward. now three different bay area locations could start to see almost $2 billion worth of new housing. cbs 5 political insider phil matier is on treasure island to tell us more on who is bankrolling all of this. >> reporter: it's interesting. behind us is a million-dollar view and that's one of the biggest selling points in this deal that has a very unusual partner. here's the story. this is treasure island today smack-dab in the middle of the sa
of america hears the great things about south carolina. [applause] >> thank you, tim. to our conservative rock star for the state of south carolina and our conservative rock star for the country and the heritage foundation, center jim -- senator jim demint. >> governor, when you say there will never be anyone like me, most of washington says, thank goodness. [laughter] i am excited about what is going on today. one of the few things i am worried about what i was considering leaving the senate was who would replace me. i knew that governor haley would put someone in this seat that we would be proud of and continue to stand for those principles of freedom and opportunity. governor, thank you for your faithfulness to our cause and your good judgment. tim, i could not be happier today. i can walk away from the senate and knowing that someone is better than i am that will carry the voice of conservatism to the whole country in a way that i could not do. i will keep working with that cause, but you inspired me since i heard you speak in public. our country needs those positive and optimistic v
the controversy started. he said i'm a proud south korean, and i was educated in america. lived there for a very significant part of the life, i understand the sacrifices of the american servicemen and women, i made these comments as part of a deeply-emotional reaction to the killing of iraqis, and it was part of the overall anti-war sentiment shared by others, but he says he deeply regrets the inflammatory and inappropriate language he used. we're taking your thoughts on it on twitter. follow me @megyn kelly. brad, dick, good debate, as always. >> thanks. megyn: after major protests in the birthplace of organized labor, there are reports that president obama will use part of his speech in detroit today to take the side of unions in the explosive right-to-work fight that is emerging in michigan. they're saying this could become the next wisconsin in terms of the uniitem battles. -- on union battles. how the rules there just changed and why. >>> plus, why folks are saying this is the best video you will see all day. >> there's a group of people around, and a little thing on the ground, at first i
. that average has fallen 10 cents in just the past week. the lowest state average in america, missouri, $2.95 a gallon. tennessee, south carolina, oklahoma, they could fall below $3 in the next couple of days. all right, big deal. that puts money into the economy, by the way. so let's go to mcdonald's -- let's not go to mcdonald's. let's go to nicole to talk about mcdonald's. the mcrib is back? nicole: either way i would go to mcdonald's with you. the mcrib is traditionally a great product for mcdonald's. launches their season. this barbecue pork sandwich has a following, stuart. they are introducing it once again now this holiday season. they have been doing well with the breakfast. they have been doing well with low-priced offerings in europe. there's a lot of high hope -- high hope on the mcrib. stuart: just doing it for december, is that correct? nicole: i think that's correct. i want to double check. i'm hesitant to say it wholeheartedly. i think that's correct. stuart: you haven't checked, in other words. you haven't been down to mcdonald's and checked? all right, you said enough. ni
. 100,000 millionaires. and south africa computer program has it easier than whe the indians want to come in but they have to wait six years. so, what if america did not let ogle or yahoo founders in? we would have lost a lot. so, since american politicians are not taking steps to change the rules to allow more entrepreneurs to come here to work, dario and max, my guests, have set out to build a ship and keep it off the coast of california outside the reach of immigration controls and foreign entrepreneurs could work here, is that the idea? >> that is correct. were creating what we call a visa free technology incubator on aship, 12 miles off the coast of the bay area. >> definitely miles escapes the rules of the united states. >>guest: it is outside the territorial waters. >> the idea is and you are from the silicon valley area, that you can come to america with a work visa and work three months or six months but you cannot stay so you have the four engineers on the boat and the silicon valley tech geniuses go back and for the and work with them? >>guest: when you come for a few m
,000 millionaires. and south africa computer program has it easier than when the indians want to come in but they have to wait six years. so, what if america did not let google or yahoo founders in? we would have lost a lot. so, since american politicians are not taking steps to change the rules to allow more entrepreneurs to come here to work, dario and max, my guests, have set out to build a ship and keep it off the coast of california outside the reach of immigration controls and foreign entrepreneurs could work here, is that the idea? >> that is correct. we are creating what we call a visa free technology incubator on a ship, 12 miles off the coast of the bay area. >> definitely miles escapes the rules of the united states. >>guest: it is outside the territorial waters. >> the idea is and you are from the silicon valley area, that you can come to america with a work visa and work three months or six months but you cannot stay so you have the four engineers on the boat and the silicon valley tech geniuses go back and for the and work with them? >>guest: when you come for a few mont
compliment. >> he made the point that ideas matter. it also matter in national security. america realized it could not win the cold war if it still had a scandalous segregation in the south. winning the civil rights battle at home was a precondition of winning the fight politically across the globe. i think looking from the outside there is the same danger now. when i go to china and i criticize them for their lack of democracy, they say but we are educating all our people. you did not do that in britain and america. when i had been in the middle east, and talk to people on the edge of radicalism, they say look at the protest in justices in your british and european and american nations. we would never allow that under an islamic state. these are self-serving versions of the truth. the allies even. nevertheless, they have power. i wanted to what extent american political leaders can articulate the case that as long as there is inequality driven by education in america, that america provides bill leadership that the world needs is compromise. one of the things it reminds me of its argument
to build a new airport south of the metropolitan area of chicago. >> airports are the one thing we do in america that people get when it comes to the partnerships. there's always criticism of this, criticism that the governments don't have money, there are criticisms that governments don't make the rht decisions. the city of chicago famously struggled with its public/private partnership on its parking meters in 2008. the city leased its system to a group of private investigators. they did a poor job of managing the transition. there were steep rate hikes and confusion and it resulted in the downgrade of the city's credit rating. i know that's not one of your projects. >> no, that's right. >> what are the lessons of that type of thing for your own initiatives? >> you got to be very careful. you know, the city also did one with the skyway, a bridge across from chicago to indiana. that was done in a better fashion. if it's not carefully done, it can really backfire. so that's why we take each step and do it in a very reasonable sound way. we're embarking on this. this is brand new for ou
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